Agrippa’s Intriguing Water-lifting Machine

In 1588, Agrippa’s water-lifting innovation captivated the notice and praise of Andrea Bacci but that turned out to be one of the very last mentions of the mechanism. It may possibly have turned out to be obsolete once the Villa Medici was in a position to obtain water from the Acqua Felice, the early contemporary channel, in 1592. 50233brz__34484.jpg Even though its triumph was passing, Camillo Agrippa’s concept for raising water was the marvel of its day, surpassing anything built in Italy since the days of classic Rome. Renaissance landscapes of the later part of the 16th century happened to be home to works including melodious water features, scenographic water exhibits and water caprices (giochi d’acqua), but these weren’t brimming with water in ways which defied gravitation itself.

Acqua Vergine: The Solution to Rome's Water Challenges

Rome’s 1st elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, residents residing at higher elevations had to rely on natural creeks for their water. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the sole technological innovations obtainable at the time to supply water to spots of greater elevation. In the early 16th century, the city began to utilize the water that ran below the ground through Acqua Vergine to supply drinking water to Pincian Hill. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. During the some 9 years he had the residential property, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi utilized these manholes to take water from the network in buckets, though they were previously built for the intent of cleaning and maintenance the aqueduct. He didn’t get a sufficient quantity of water from the cistern that he had manufactured on his residential property to gather rainwater. Thankfully, the aqueduct sat below his residence, and he had a shaft opened to give him accessibility.

The Beauty of Tiered Water Features

Fountains with more than one level are very easy to find, and popular above all in gardens. Mediterranean countries such as Italy and Spain generally have lots of multi-level fountains.

Common places to see them are in courtyards and city squares. All tiered fountains are enchanting, although some have much more elaborate carvings than others.

Traditional or classic settings are ideal spots for them. The fountain should blend right into the environment as if it has been there since the start.

An Absolute Roman Masterpiece: The Santa Maria Fountain in Cosmedin

Incredible discoveries of both Christian and pagan origin have been made by archaeologists and restorers in the area of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The nearby basilica is largely famous for the marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità, (Mouth of Truth) located in its entryway. When the Santa Maria in Cosmedin water fountain was built in 1719, it was off the beaten track and generally unknown as a result. Due to the fact that the nearby area was gloomy and mostly uninhabited, visitors were not particularly interested in visiting it. As part of a project to refurbish the piazza outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was commissioned by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. Work on the church's infrastructure started on on August 11, 1717. The blessing of the first stone to be placed in the foundation was followed by medals being tossed in bearing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water.

Where did Garden Water Fountains Come From?

The dramatic or decorative effect of a fountain is just one of the purposes it fulfills, as well as delivering drinking water and adding a decorative touch to your property.

The main purpose of a fountain was originally strictly practical. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to supply them with drinking water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. Until the late nineteenth, century most water fountains operated using the force of gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a supply of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Acting as an element of decoration and celebration, fountains also provided clean, fresh drinking water. Bronze or stone masks of wildlife and heroes were frequently seen on Roman fountains. To illustrate the gardens of paradise, Muslim and Moorish garden planners of the Middle Ages introduced fountains to their designs. King Louis XIV of France wanted to demonstrate his dominion over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to extol their positions by including beautiful baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Since indoor plumbing became the norm of the day for fresh, drinking water, by the end of the 19th century urban fountains were no longer needed for this purpose and they became purely decorative. Impressive water effects and recycled water were made possible by switching the power of gravity with mechanical pumps.

Beautifying city parks, honoring people or events and entertaining, are some of the purposes of modern-day fountains.

Experience the World’s Tallest Water Fountains

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia has the leading continuously- running fountain known as the King Fahd Fountain (1985). It spouts out water reaching 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

Reaching water heights of 202 meters (663 feet), the World Cup Fountain in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), is recognized as the 2nd highest worldwide.

The Gateway Geyser (1995) found next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri is number three on the list. Regarded as the tallest fountain in the United States, it propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the sky.

With water ejected 190 meters (620 feet) in the air, the Port Fountain in Karachi, Pakistan makes it on the list.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can reach up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are running, even though it typically only reaches up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain, opened to the public in 2009, is located next to the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. The fountain propels water up to 73 meters (240 feet) and performs once every half hour to pre-recorded music - and even has extreme shooters, not used in every show, which reach up to 150 meters (490 feet).

Making it in the top 8 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra (1970) which measures 147 meters (482 feet).

The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet).


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