From Where Did Large Outdoor Fountains Come From?

bzbaw_2__92111.jpg The incredible construction of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to complement your home.

From the beginning, outdoor fountains were simply meant to serve as functional elements. Water fountains were linked to a spring or aqueduct to provide drinkable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Until the late 19th, century most water fountains operated using gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a supply of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Fountains were an excellent source of water, and also served to decorate living areas and memorialize the designer. The main materials used by the Romans to build their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly depicting animals or heroes. To depict the gardens of paradise, Muslim and Moorish garden planners of the Middle Ages added fountains to their designs. Fountains played a considerable role in the Gardens of Versailles, all part of French King Louis XIV’s desire to exercise his power over nature. The Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries were extolled with baroque style fountains constructed to mark the arrival points of Roman aqueducts.

Urban fountains built at the end of the 19th century functioned only as decorative and celebratory adornments since indoor plumbing provided the essential drinking water. Fountains using mechanical pumps instead of gravity enabled fountains to deliver recycled water into living spaces as well as create special water effects.

Decorating city parks, honoring people or events and entertaining, are some of the purposes of modern-day fountains.

Water Delivery Solutions in Early Rome

With the construction of the first elevated aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, folks who lived on the city’s hillsides no longer had to rely strictly on naturally-occurring spring water for their demands. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the sole techniques obtainable at the time to supply water to areas of high elevation. To deliver water to Pincian Hill in the early sixteenth century, they utilized the emerging process of redirecting the motion from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground channel. The aqueduct’s channel was made attainable by pozzi, or manholes, that were placed along its length when it was 1st developed. While these manholes were developed to make it easier to maintain the aqueduct, it was also possible to use buckets to pull water from the channel, which was utilized by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he obtained the property in 1543 to his death in 1552. The cistern he had constructed to gather rainwater wasn’t sufficient to meet his water specifications. That is when he decided to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran directly below his residential property.

The Story of the Magnificent Cascade Fountain at the Garden of Chatsworth

The Cascade garden fountain forms a incredible garden decoration at the rear of Chatsworth House. Twenty-four irregularly positioned stone steps in a series stretch 200 yards in the direction of the house and all the way down the hillside.

Based mostly on a 17th century French concept, the Cascade is also entirely gravity fed. This water fountain has been kept the same after being designed for the first Duke of Devonshire in 1696. The Cascade House overlooks the fountain, where water slowly moves downward. Sea creatures in bas-relief embellish the external part of the residence which is a small construction. Water pressure to the Cascade can be boosted on special occasions, meaning the Cascade House becomes part of the Cascade spectacle, as water flows through conduits on its roof and from the mouths of its carved ocean creatures, prior to continuing down the Cascade. The sounds of the water cascading varies as it descends down the Cascades mainly because of the small variance in the size of each and every step thereby creating a fantastic and soothing complement to a walking through the gardens. This cascade was chosen in a survey, carried out by Country Life in 2004, as the UK'sbest water fountain.

How Garden Water Features Improve Your Office Space Setting

Build up business success with a garden fountain. A beautiful feature such as this will make clients feel welcome to your workplace. In contrast to the more typical fountains found in people’s homes, garden fountains installed in corporate areas should create a lasting impression as well as provide a warm, welcoming ambiance.

It is vital to any firm to get visitors and then also make a positive impression on them. It is easy to create natural spaces in even the smallest of spaces by putting in garden water fountains, attractive plants and flowers, among other things. Even larger, more alluring garden displays can be set up in business areas that have more open space available. That said, there are plenty that only have room for a little display with which to create an impressive and lasting statement.

In the end, the main goal is to create an atmosphere that attracts new interest in your business. Having a beautiful garden fountain at the entrance to your company who want to give your business a try.

Garden Water Fountains And Public Policy

In February 2014, a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages was approved in Berkley, CA, making it the first city in the United States to submit such a law. By making soda more expensive, it’s hoped that individuals will make better choices for what their children drink, like water as an example. Efforts were made to find out the status of community drinking water fountains in both high- and low-income neighborhoods. The research utilized a GPS app to collect data on present water fountains in the city. The US Census Community Study database was utilized to compile information related to race and economic status in these locations.

The two data sets were compared to identify what class variances, if any, there were in access to running water fountains. They were in a position to confirm the demographics of areas surrounding established fountains, as well as the tidiness and maintenance of fountains across various areas. Some of the water fountains were dirty or blocked, in spite of the fact that the majority of fountains worked.

Gardens of Chatworth: The "Revelation" Fountain

“Revelation,” the newest addition to the decorative garden fountains of Chatsworth, was designed by well-known British sculptor Angela Conner. In celebration of the Queen’s 80th birthday, she was mandated by the deceased 11th Duke of Devonshire to make a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth made of brass and steel in 2004. One of Chatsworth’s oldest ponds, Jack Pond, had “Revelation” installed in it in 1999. The four big steel flower petals close and open with the circulation of water, alternatively camouflaging and showing a golden globe at the sculpture’s center. Standing five meters high and five meters wide, the globe was crafted from metal and then coated with gold dust. This latest water fountain is a fascinating addition to the Chatsworth Gardens because the petals’ movement is totally driven by water.


The Famous Revelation Waterworks at the Gardens of Chatsworth
Created by celebrated British sculptor Angela Conner, Revelation is the most recent addition to the Chatsworth decorative outdoor water features. In commemoration of the Queen’s 80th... read more
"Old School" Water Feature Designers
Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and cultivated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, fountain designers were multi-faceted individuals, Leonardo... read more
Ancient Fountain Designers
Water fountain designers were multi-talented people from the 16th to the late 18th century, often working as architects, sculptors, artisans, engineers and cultivated scholars all in one. Leonardo da Vinci as a inspired master, inventor and scientific expert exemplified... read more