Why Your Your Furry Friends and Visiting Birds Relish Water Fountains

Outdoor water features and bird feeders are a healthy way to draw in wildlife and pets. All birds need somewhere to drink, bathe and preen. wwmhs_cp_2__40285.jpg Birds such as robins, thrushes, orioles, or warblers are usually attracted to the flowing water of fountains. While bowl-shaped bird baths can be unexciting to many birds, fountains are more inviting because of the moving water they produce. Birds are greatly attracted to the trickling and splashing sounds produced.

Dogs are attracted to fountains because they provide refreshing water to drink. Hot days drive dogs and cats to anxiously look for the freshest water around. Also, regularly flowing water fountains require less upkeep than the still water of a birdbath that tend to get dirtier.

Factors to Know When Setting up a Garden Water Feature

Two things many people forget about when planning the installation of a garden fountain is a suitable water source and an electrical outlet in close proximity. The joy of owning one occasionally causes people to forget the technical aspects when setting it up for the first time. Most power cords are 12 feet long and call for a 120v outdoor electrical outlet, though an extension cord can always be added.

A practical place to get water is important since you will need to fill your fountain. Water is challenging to move by yourself from place to place. If you have given thought to it before installation, having a hose close by will make the job of filling the fountain much easier. If you have an expert on hand, you may want to consider getting a water fountain autofill with a connection to an external water line, as this would be much simpler in the long run.

The Dazzling Cascade Water Fountain at Chatsworth

The Cascade garden fountain forms a magnificent main feature to the gardens and is situated at the rear of Chatsworth House. Extending down the hillside for 200 yards in the direction of the home is a series of 24 irregularly spread stone steps. The Cascade, also entirely gravity fed, is primarily based on a 17th century French design. Created for the initial Duke of Devonshire in 1696, this water fountain has remained the same ever since. Located at the peak of the fountain is the Cascade House, from which water streams downward.

The residence, decorated on the outside with marine creatures in bas-relief, is actually a small-scale building. Water pressure to the Cascade can be boosted on specific occasions, meaning the Cascade House becomes part of the Cascade spectacle, as water runs through conduits on its roof and from the mouths of its carved marine creatures, before continuing straight down the Cascade. The sound of the water falling differs as it descends down the Cascades because of the small difference in the size of each and every step thereby delivering a fantastic and soothing accompaniment to a walking through the gardens. In 2004, Chatsworth's Cascade was voted the best water fountain in the UK.

Rome’s Early Water Transport Solutions

Prior to 273, when the 1st elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was constructed in Rome, residents who dwelled on hillsides had to travel even further down to get their water from natural sources. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the sole technologies around at the time to supply water to segments of higher elevation. In the early 16th century, the city began to use the water that ran below ground through Acqua Vergine to provide water to Pincian Hill. Pozzi, or manholes, were built at regular stretches along the aqueduct’s channel. During the roughly 9 years he had the property, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi made use of these manholes to take water from the network in containers, though they were previously established for the objective of cleaning and servicing the aqueduct. Although the cardinal also had a cistern to accumulate rainwater, it didn’t produce enough water.

That is when he made a decision to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran below his residential property.

Rome, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, And Water Features

In Rome’s city center, there are many famous fountains. One of the greatest sculptors and artists of the 17th century, Gian Lorenzo Bernini designed, created and built nearly all of them. Also a city designer, he had skills as a water feature designer, and traces of his life's work are noticeable throughout the streets of Rome. Bernini's father, a renowned Florentine sculptor, mentored his young son, and they ultimately moved to Rome, in order to fully express their art, primarily in the form of public water fountains and water features. The young Bernini received encouragement from Popes and influential artists alike, and was an exceptional employee. He was originally renowned for his sculpture. Most notably in the Vatican, he made use of a base of expertise in ancient Greek architecture and melded it effortlessly with Roman marble. Though he was influenced by many, Michelangelo had the most serious impact on him, both personally and professionally.

Where are the World’s Biggest Fountains?

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia has the leading continuously- running water fountain known as the King Fahd Fountain (1985).

It propels water reaching 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

Coming in 2nd is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water shooting 202 meters (663 feet).

Next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is the Gateway Geyser (1995) which reaches third place. With water reaching 192 meters (630 feet) in the air, this fountain is the tallest in the U.S..

With water ejected 190 meters (620 feet) in the air, the Port Fountain in Karachi, Pakistan makes it on the list.

Number 4: Fountain Park (1970), Fountain Hills, Arizona - although it can reach heights of 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are in use, it only reaches 91 meters (300 feet) on a normal day.

The Dubai Fountain made its first appearance in 2009 close to the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa. It performs every 1/2 hour to previously recorded songs and propels water up to 73 meters (240 feet) in height -it also has built in extreme shooters, though only used during special events, which reach 150 meters (490 feet) in height.

Propelling water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in seventh.

The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet).


The Dissemination of Water Feature Design Technology
Instrumental to the advancement of scientific technology were the printed papers and illustrated publications of the day. They were also the primary method of transmitting practical hydraulic information and... read more
The City Of Rome, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, And Statuary Fountains
There are countless celebrated Roman water features in its city center. One of the best ever sculptors and artists of the 17th century, nearly all of them... read more
Fountains: The Minoan Society
Archaeological excavations in Minoan Crete in Greece have exposed several kinds of conduits. They not solely aided with the water supplies, they extracted rainwater and wastewater as well. The principle components... read more
Statuary As a Staple of Classic Art in Archaic Greece
Up right up until the Archaic Greeks created the very first freestanding statuary, a phenomenal success, carvings had mainly been accomplished in walls and pillars as reliefs. For the most part the statues, or kouros figures, were of adolescent and... read more