Keep Your Wall fountain Clean

ft-239__07218.jpg Water fountains will keep working a very long time with scheduled cleaning and maintenance. It is essential to clean it out and remove any debris or foreign objects that might have dropped into or onto it. Another factor is that water that is exposed to sunlight is prone to growing algae. Either sea salt, hydrogen peroxide, or vinegar can be mixed into the water to prevent this issue. There are those who choose to use bleach, but that is hazardous to any animals that might drink or bathe in the water - so should therefore be avoided.

Experts advise that the typical garden fountain undergoes a thorough scouring every three-four months. Before you start cleaning, all of the water must be removed. Once it is empty, scrub inside the reservoir with a mild cleanser. Feel free to use a toothbrush if helpful for any smaller crevasses. Make sure all the soap is properly rinsed off.

It is highly recommended taking the pump apart to better clean the inside and get rid of any plankton or calcium. Soaking it in vinegar for a time will make it easier to wash. If you want to minimize build-up in your fountain, use rain water or mineral water rather than tap water, as these don’t contain any components that will stick to the inside of the pump.

Lastly, make sure your fountain is always full by checking it every day - this will keep it in tip-top shape. Low water levels can damage the pump - and you do not want that!

Tiered Fountains for your Yard

Fountains with multiple levels can be seen just about anywhere and have been displayed in gardens for many years. These types of fountains are common in Italy, Spain, and other Mediterranean countries. While they can be seen anywhere, they are most typical in the center of building complexes and in popular areas where people get together. While some tiered fountains have ornate designs including sculptures or artwork, others are very simple.

Although they can be found just about anywhere, they seem particularly at home in more classic environments. It should look as if the fountain has been part of the environment since the beginning and should blend in accordingly.

Where did Landscape Fountains Begin?

A fountain, an incredible piece of engineering, not only supplies drinking water as it pours into a basin, it can also launch water high into the air for an extraordinary effect.

The main purpose of a fountain was originally strictly practical. Water fountains were connected to a spring or aqueduct to provide potable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Used until the nineteenth century, in order for fountains to flow or shoot up into the air, their origin of water such as reservoirs or aqueducts, had to be higher than the water fountain in order to benefit from the power of gravity. Fountains were an optimal source of water, and also served to decorate living areas and memorialize the designer. Bronze or stone masks of wildlife and heroes were frequently seen on Roman fountains. To illustrate the gardens of paradise, Muslim and Moorish garden planners of the Middle Ages introduced fountains to their designs. Fountains enjoyed a considerable role in the Gardens of Versailles, all part of French King Louis XIV’s desire to exert his power over nature. The Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries were glorified with baroque style fountains constructed to mark the place of entry of Roman aqueducts.

Indoor plumbing became the key source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby restricting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. Amazing water effects and recycled water were made possible by replacing the power of gravity with mechanical pumps.

Nowadays, fountains decorate public spaces and are used to pay tribute to individuals or events and fill recreational and entertainment needs.

Chatsworth Garden and its Attention-Grabbing Cascading Water Feature

At the rear of Chatsworth House, the Cascade garden fountain forms a dazzling centerpiece to the landscape. Twenty-four irregularly positioned stone steps stretch down the hillside for 200 yards towards the residence. The Cascade is based on a 17th century French style and is totally gravity fed too. In 1696, this particular water fountain was created for the first Duke of Devonshire and has stayed unaltered ever since that time. The Cascade House stands at the very top of the fountain where water spills downward.

Ornamented on the outside of the house with marine creatures in bas-relief, the house is a small construction. Water pressure to the Cascade can be enhanced on specific occasions, meaning the Cascade House becomes part of the Cascade sight, as liquid circulates through conduits on its roof and from the mouths of its carved sea creatures, prior to continuing straight down the Cascade. The shape of every single step was made slightly different and means that the music of the water cascading differs as it descends the Cascades, offering a superb and soothing complement to a walk through the gardens. Back in 2004, Chatsworth's Cascade was recognized by historians at Country Life as the best water fountain in England.

Gardens of Chatworth: The Revelation Water Feature

Angela Conner, the famous British sculptor, crafted “Revelation,” the latest addition to the decorative exterior fountains of Chatsworth. In 2004/2005 she was commissioned by the now deceased 11th Duke of Devonshire to create a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth, in brass and steel, for the Queen’s 80th birthday celebration. One of Chatsworth’s oldest ponds, Jack Pond, had “Revelation” placed in it in 1999. It takes on the form of four large flower petals designed of steel which open and close with the water flow, alternately concealing and exposing a gold colored globe at the sculpture’s center. A gold dust decorated metal globe was manufactured and added to the large sculpture standing five meters in height and five meters in width. This latest water fountain is an exciting and interesting addition to the Chatsworth Gardens, unique in that the motion of the petals is completely driven by water.

The Attraction of Simple Garden Decor: The Wall fountain

It is also feasible to place your exterior water fountain near a wall since they do not need to be connected to a nearby pond. Nowadays, you can do away with digging, difficult installations and cleaning the pond. Since this feature is self-contained, no plumbing work is required. Adding water on a frequent} basis is necessary, however. Your pond should always have clean water, so be sure to drain the basin whenever it gets dirty.

Stone and metal are most common elements used to make garden wall fountains even though they can be manufactured from other materials as well. The most suitable material for your water feature depends entirely on the design you prefer. Outdoor wall fountains come in many forms and sizes, therefore ensure that the design you choose to purchase is hand-crafted, easy to hang and lightweight. The fountain you buy needs to be simple to maintain as well. While there may be some cases in which the setup needs a bit more care, generally the majority require a minimal amount of effort to install since the only two parts which require scrutiny are the re-circulating pump and the hanging equipment. You can rest assured your garden can be easily enlivened by installing this kind of fountain.


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