Early Crete & The Minoans: Water Fountains

Various different kinds of conduits have been unveiled through archaeological digs on the isle of Crete, the birthplace of Minoan society. wwlhcg-cv__52782.jpg They not only aided with the water supply, they extracted rainwater and wastewater as well. Many were created from clay or rock. Terracotta was selected for waterways and pipes, both rectangle-shaped and circular. Amidst these were clay conduits which were U-shaped or a shorter, cone-like shape which have just appeared in Minoan society. Knossos Palace had a advanced plumbing network made of clay conduits which ran up to three meters under ground. The terracotta water pipes were also used for accumulating and saving water. These clay pipelines were needed to perform: Underground Water Transportation: This hidden setup for water movement may have been chosen to give water to specified people or activities. Quality Water Transportation: Considering the data, a number of scholars suggest that these pipelines were not attached to the common water distribution process, supplying the castle with water from a distinctive source.

"Primitive" Greek Artwork: Large Statuary

Archaic Greeks were known for developing the first freestanding statuary; up until then, most carvings were made out of walls and pillars as reliefs. Most of these freestanding sculptures were what is known as kouros figures, statues of young, attractive male or female (kore) Greeks. Thought of by Greeks to represent skin care, the kouroi were created into inflexible, forward facing positions with one foot outstretched, and the male statues were always nude, well-developed, and fit. In 650 BC, life-size versions of the kouroi began to be seen. The Archaic period was an amazing time of transformation for the Greeks as they grew into new modes of government, produced fresh expressions of art, and achieved knowledge of the people and cultures outside of Greece. But in spite of the disputes, the Greek civilization continued to progress, unabated.

The Benefits of Solar Powered Wall fountains

Your garden wall fountain can be powered by numerous power sources. Eco-friendly solar powered fountains, which are now easily available, have substituted older fountains which run on electricity. Even though starting costs may be greater, solar powered water fountains are the most economical going forward. The most common materials used to make solar powered water features are terra cotta, copper, porcelain, or bronze. You should be able to find the right type of fountain to fit your design requirements. Easy to upkeep and an excellent way to make a substantial contribution to the environment, they are wonderful additions to your garden sanctuary as well.

Beyond its visual charm, indoor wall fountains can also serve to keep your house at a cool temperature. Yet another option to air conditioners and swamp coolers, they employ the identical principles to cool your living space You can also save on your electric costs because they use less energy.

A fan can be used to blow fresh, dry air across them so as to create a cooling effect.

You can either take advantage of air from a corner of your living space or turn on your ceiling fan to improve the circulation in the room It is crucial to ensure that air is consistently blowing over the top of the water. It is normal for fountains and waterfalls to produce cool, crisp air. Merely standing in the vicinity of a large public fountain or waterfall will send a sudden chill through whoever is nearby. Placing your fountain cooling system in a spot where it will be exposed to additional heat is not useful. Your fountain will be less reliable if you put it in the sunlight.

The Extraordinary Santa Maria in Cosmedin Water Fountain in Rome

Archaeologists and restorers alike have stumbled upon a wealth of heathen and Christian artifacts on the grounds of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The celebrated marble sculpture called the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth) is located in the portico of the basilica nearby. Built in 1719, the Santa Maria in Cosmedin water fountain was relatively unknown and located far from sight making it hard to visit. It was said that there was nothing worth seeing in this area, as it was bleak and desolate making it an unfriendly place to visit. As part of a project to modernize the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was commissioned by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. August 11, 1717 saw the beginning of the task to lay down the foundation of the church. The blessing of the first stone to be placed in the foundation was followed by medals being tossed in showing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water.

The Story of the Grandiose Cascade Fountain at the Garden of Chatsworth

Forming a fabulous main feature to the landscape at the back of Chatsworth House is the Cascade garden fountain. Twenty-four irregularly spaced stone steps reach down the hillside for 200 yards towards the residence. Founded on a 17th century French design, the Cascade is also completely gravity fed. Remaining unaltered since its inception, this water fountain was originally designed for the very first Duke of Devonshire in 1696. The Cascade House overlooks the fountain, where water gently moves downward. Ornamented on the exterior with deep-sea creatures in bas-relief, the house is a small construction. Water pressure to the Cascade can be boosted on special occasions, meaning the Cascade House becomes part of the Cascade pageant, as liquid spills through conduits on its roof and from the jaws of its carved ocean creatures, before proceeding all the way down the Cascade. The sound of the water falling differs as it falls down the Cascades because of the slight variation in the size of every single step thereby delivering a great and soothing complement to a trek through the gardens.

This cascade was chosen in a survey, carried out by Country Life in 2004, as England'sbest water fountain.

The Reason Behind Water Features in Japanese Gardens

No Japanese garden is complete without a water feature. They tend to be put right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are thought to be representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. Since water is the most essential element of any Japanese fountain, the design is normally simple.

Bamboo is a common material to use for spouts and therefore often integrated into water fountains. Underneath the bamboo spout is usually a stone basin which receives the water as it trickles down from the spout. People usually make them appear weathered and worn, even when they are new. It is vital that the overall look of the fountain goes with the natural environment, so people typically place plants, rocks, and flowers around it. Clearly this fountain is much more than just a pretty add-on.

For something a bit more distinctive, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then decorate it creatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. In time, as moss gradually covers the rocks, it becomes even more natural-looking.

Wherever there is sufficient open space, you have the possibility to build a more extensive water feature. Consider adding a beautiful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

However, water does not have to be an addition in a Japanese water fountain. Many people decide to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in real water. Natural rocks that are flat and laid out tightly together can be used to give the illusion of running water.


Agrippa’s Intriguing Water-lifting Appliance
In 1588, Agrippa’s water-lifting invention attracted the notice and compliments of Andrea Bacci but that turned out to be one of the final references of the technology. Merely years later, in 1592,... read more
Factors to Think About When Installing a Garden Water Feature
A water source and an electrical socket are two crucial items that many people do not consider when determining where they want to setup their garden... read more